Super Bowl 2012 T.V Commercials

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The Super Bowl 2012 isn’t just the biggest day of the year for football fans—it’s also the most important event for some of the world’s largest companies.   A 30-second ad spot during this year’s Super Bowl Game will cost an average of $3.50 million and reach an estimated 117.5 million viewers, meaning that companies can make or break their year with a single commercial During the Super Bowl 2012

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You will see the usual suspects on Super Bowl Sunday: Pepsi, Budweiser, Honda, Chevy, etc. Of course, a massive budget and a recognizable name doesn’t equal successful commercials.

                                                             The Top Three Advertisers for the Super Bowl 2012

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Pepsi – 2012 –

Pepsi was clearly just trying to shoe-horn their “Where There’s Pepsi, There’s Music” slogan into any concept they could, but came up short here. It reminds us of some kind of summer-camp sketch from our pre-tween years. They should have just given away $10 million worth of Pepsi instead.

chevy

Chevy Silverado – 2012 – 2012

Enjoy this Super Bowl folks, it may in fact be our last. At least according to the Mayan calendar and this Chevy ad, which manages to somehow slip marketing speak into a character’s mouth and have it come out funny. Make sure you have the right truck when the end of the world hits.

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Budweiser Canada – 2012 – Flash Fans

The U.S. isn’t the only country to enjoy Super Bowl commercials. Budweiser Canada played the most kind-spirited prank on two amateur Canadian hockey teams, and treated them to a “flash-mob” of epic proportions. This spot will air during the Canadian Super Bowl broadcast, but we get to enjoy it here first!

Make Money on Line – http://buildwithdon.com

 

Groundhog Day February 2nd - 2012

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Groundhog Day    is a holiday celebrated on February 2 in the United States and Canada. According to folklore, if it is cloudy when a groundhog emerges from its burrow on this day, it will leave the burrow, signifying that winter-like weather will soon end. If it is sunny, the groundhog will supposedly see its shadow and retreat back into its burrow, and the winter weather will continue for six more weeks.

Modern customs of the holiday involve celebrations where early morning festivals are held to watch the groundhog emerging from its burrow. In southeastern Pennsylvania, Groundhog Lodges (Grundsow Lodges) celebrate the holiday with fersommlinge, social events in which food is served, speeches are made, and one or more g’spiel (plays or skits) are performed for entertainment. The Pennsylvania German dialect is the only language spoken at the event, and those who speak English pay a penalty, usually in the form of a nickeldime or quarter, per word spoken, put into a bowl in the center of the table.[3]

The largest Groundhog Day celebration is held in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania. Groundhog Day, already a widely recognized and popular tradition,, received widespread attention as a result of the eponymous 1993 film Groundhog Day, which was set in Punxsutawney and portrayed Punxsutawney Phil. 

History

The celebration, which began as a Pennsylvania German custom in southeastern and central Pennsylvania in the 18th and 19th centuries, has its origins in ancient European weather lore, wherein abadger or sacred bear is the prognosticator as opposed to a groundhog. It also bears similarities to the Pagan festival of Imbolc, the seasonal turning point of the Celtic calendar, which is celebrated on February 1 and also involves weather prognostication.[7] and to St. Swithun‘s Day in July.

Historical origins

The groundhog (Marmota monax) is a rodent of the family Sciuridae, belonging to the group of large ground squirrels.

Statue of groundhog Wiarton Willie in Wiarton, Ontario

An early American reference to Groundhog Day can be found in a diary entry,  dated February 4, 1841, of Berks County, Pennsylvania, storekeeper James Morris:

Last Tuesday, the 2nd, was Candlemas day, the day on which, according to the Germans, the Groundhog peeps out of his winter quarters and if he sees his shadow he pops back for another six weeks nap, but if the day be cloudy he remains out, as the weather is to be moderate.

In Scotland the tradition may also derive from an English poem:

As the light grows longer
The cold grows stronger
If Candlemas be fair and bright
Winter will have another flight
If Candlemas be cloud and rain
Winter will be gone and not come again
A farmer should on Candlemas day
Have half his corn and half his hay
On Candlemas day if thorns hang a drop
You can be sure of a good pea crop

Alternative origin theories

In western countries in the Northern Hemisphere the official first day of Spring is almost seven weeks (46–48 days) after Groundhog Day, on March 20 or March 21. About 1,000 years ago, before the adoption of the Gregorian calendar when the date of the equinox drifted in the Julian calendar, the spring equinox fell on March 16 instead. This is exactly six weeks after February 2. The custom could have been a folk embodiment of the confusion created by the collision of two calendrical systems. Some ancient traditions marked the change of season at cross-quarter days such as Imbolc when daylight first makes significant progress against the night. Other traditions held that Spring did not begin until the length of daylight overtook night at the Vernal Equinox. So an arbiter, the groundhog/hedgehog, was incorporated as a yearly custom to settle the two traditions. Sometimes Spring begins at Imbolc, and sometimes Winter lasts 6 more weeks until the equinox.[10]

 

Locations

The largest Groundhog Day celebration is held in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, where crowds as large as 40,000[11] have gathered to celebrate the holiday since at least 1886.[12] Other celebrations of note in Pennsylvania take place in Quarryville in Lancaster County,[13] the Anthracite Region of Schuylkill County,[14] the Sinnamahoning Valley[15] and Bucks County.[16]

Outside of Penn  notable celebrations occur in the Frederick and Hagerstown areas of Maryland,[17] the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia,[18] Woodstock, Illinois,[19] Lilburn, Georgia,[20] among the Amish populations of over twenty states and at Wiarton, Ontario, and Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia, in Canada.[18] The University of Dallas in Irving, Texas, has taken Groundhog Day as its official university holiday and organizes a large-scale celebration every year in honor of the Groundhog.[21]

 

 

 

Raging Solar Storm Is Hitting Earth Right Now

The largest solar storm since 2005 is now in progress, causing fluctuations on the power grid and disruptions to the Global Positioning System. The ongoing strong proton storm is in full rage and gradually increasing because of a Coronal Mass Ejection impact—caused by a January 22 M8.7 class flare—that is now arriving to Earth at 1400 miles per second.

The radiation and geomagnetic storm caused by this CME are normal—about 2,000 geomagnetic storms happen every 11-year solar cycle—but proton storms are very rare. Only a couple of dozen happen per solar cycle. This one—ranking S3 on a 5-level scale—is dangerous.

The solar storm has already affected aircraft traffic and may affect satellites’ computers. On a telephone interview, NOAA’s Space Weather Prediction Center physicist Doug Biesecker told me that, fortunately, there are measures to avoid most dangers.

“Many airliners have been avoiding the North Pole routes because they are more exposed to the proton storm, which disrupts High Frequency radio communications,” he said on a telephone interview. HF datalinks are crucial to modern airflight, as they keep aircraft connected to Air Traffic Control. Due to the structure of the magnetic field that surrounds Earth, the polar cusps have very little protection against outbursts of solar radiation, so any airplane crossing that area could be exposed to this mayhem.

We’re experiencing technical difficulties

He also said that satellites may be affected, causing reboots on onboard computers as well as noise in imaging systems and interferences in telemetry caused by something called single event upsets. These events may change the values of the telemetry data. Since we are aware of these interferences in advance, engineers on ground bases can take them into account and make corrections before firing any commands that may jeopardize the life of the spacecraft.

 

Raging Solar Storm Is Hitting Earth Right Now

The only real unpredictable danger is a total hardware failure, with a proton hitting an electronic component and killing it. But according to Biesecker, this “is a very remote possibility.”

Global positioning systems are also affected—and will be even more affected tomorrow. Regular humans will not notice this. You will be able to keep using your GPS normally, but people using high precision GPS equipments—like oil drilling, military, engineering and mining operations—will definitely notice the problems solar storm.

 

 

Storm in action

 

Craigslist and Wikipedia and other websites shut down to protest online piracy bill.

 Craigslist and  Wikipedia and other websites go dark today in what backers are calling the largest Internet protest ever, the epic battle between Silicon Valley and Hollywood over online anti-piracy legislation continues to heat up, even as many Web surfers scratch their heads over what it all means. Craigslist and Wikipedia are very popular.The fight is over the Stop Online Piracy Act, a bill now stalled in the U.S. House of Representatives that’s aimed at stopping the spread of pirated copies of movies and other content by “rogue” websites overseas. Heavyweight supporters of SOPA such as Time Warner and the Motion Picture Association of America are butting up against tech titans such as Craigslist and  WikipediaGoogle and Facebook, which argue that the legislation could lead to widespread censorship.

What is SOPA?

They say the bill is necessary to rein in copyright infringement, craigslist and wikipedia specifically from pirate sites outside the United States, by essentially cutting off their oxygen supply, says Eric Goldman, director of the High Tech Law Institute at Santa Clara University and a neutral observer in the debate.

“We can’t send in the feds to bust them,” he said, “and the intellectual property, or IP, owners can’t go after them in U.S. court. So these bills create ways to marginalize websites craigslist and wikipedia by cutting off their domain name or their money supply, doing things like requiring credit-card companies to stop making payments to the sites and require ad networks to drop them as customers.”

 

 Aren’t there already laws that punish online pirates?

Digital Millennium Copyright Act does provide enforcement measures. For example, if someone uploads a copyrighted song to YouTube, the act gives the song’s rights holder the ability to send a notice demanding the site remove it. In this case, YouTube must let the offending uploader know the song has been flagged, and that person in turn could object and even appeal the matter in court.But SOPA proponents say that because the copyright act doesn’t have the legal teeth to bite down on overseas offenders, new legislation is crucial if made-in-the-U.S.A. content is to be protected in the global wilderness of the Internet, including craigslist and wikipedia

http://youtu.be/wIm6edbjhN0

  Why are the two sides so adamant about their positions on the bills?

Tiffiniy Cheng, director of online-freedom advocacy group Fight for the Future of Craigslist and Wikipedia , says both the SOPA and the Senate bill as written “give corporations too much power to take down entire sites over what they consider a copyright infringement including craigslist and Wikipedia.. And the language in the bills is really vague when it comes to ‘enabling copyright infringement.’ Cheng says the vagaries of the legislation could encourage credit-card companies and ad networks to “go on the safe side and comply with all requests from rights owners to shut down a site, even if it’s not really doing anything wrong. Plus, it could lead other sites to self-censor their posts to risk even the chance of liability.”

But in a statement supporting SOPA, the Motion Picture Association of America points out that “the potential harm from rogue sites — exposure to malware, identity theft, unsafe and untested medicines and other counterfeit products, and lost jobs and income for creative workers — is profound. Too much is at stake for us to allow rogue sites and those who operate them to continue to steal creative works with impunity.”

Who are the online protesters and what do they hope to achieve?

MoveOn.org is joining Reddit, Wikipedia, Mozilla and thousands of other sites, many of them in Silicon Valley, in a show of opposition to what they call “Internet censorship legislation that threatens free speech and technology innovation on the Internet.”

Cheng said more than 7,000 websites have agreed to take some sort of online action to rally opposition to the two bills, with Wikipedia planning to go dark for 24 hours starting 9 p.m. PST Tuesday. Other sites, including Mountain View-based Google, planned to issue protest statements on their home pages.

What’s the political prognosis for the legislation?

The Two  bills are currently tied up in Congress, with the Senate bill on hold while SOPA’s fate is pending action by the House Judiciary Committee. More shadows loom after the Obama administration issued a statement saying, “We will not support legislation that reduces freedom of expression, increases cybersecurity risk or undermines the dynamic, innovative global Internet.”  This will not stop Wikipedia.

 

 

Craigslist and Wikipedia and other websites shut down to protest online piracy bill.

 Craigslist and  Wikipedia and other websites go dark today in what backers are calling the largest Internet protest ever, the epic battle between Silicon Valley and Hollywood over online anti-piracy legislation continues to heat up, even as many Web surfers scratch their heads over what it all means. Craigslist and Wikipedia are very popular.The fight is over the Stop Online Piracy Act, a bill now stalled in the U.S. House of Representatives that’s aimed at stopping the spread of pirated copies of movies and other content by “rogue” websites overseas. Heavyweight supporters of SOPA such as Time Warner and the Motion Picture Association of America are butting up against tech titans such as Craigslist and  WikipediaGoogle and Facebook, which argue that the legislation could lead to widespread censorship.

What is SOPA?

They say the bill is necessary to rein in copyright infringement, craigslist and wikipedia  specifically from pirate sites outside the United States, by essentially cutting off their oxygen supply, says Eric Goldman, director of the High Tech Law Institute at Santa Clara University and a neutral observer in the debate.

“We can’t send in the feds to bust them,” he said, “and the intellectual property, or IP, owners can’t go after them in U.S. court. So these bills create ways to marginalize websites  craigslist and wikipedia by cutting off their domain name or their money supply, doing things like requiring credit-card companies to stop making payments to the sites and require ad networks to drop them as customers.”

 

 Aren’t there already laws that punish online pirates?

Digital Millennium Copyright Act does provide enforcement measures. For example, if someone uploads a copyrighted song to YouTube, the act gives the song’s rights holder the ability to send a notice demanding the site remove it. In this case, YouTube must let the offending uploader know the song has been flagged, and that person in turn could object and even appeal the matter in court.But SOPA proponents say that because the copyright act doesn’t have the legal teeth to bite down on overseas offenders, new legislation is crucial if made-in-the-U.S.A. content is to be protected in the global wilderness of the Internet, including craigslist and wikipedia

http://youtu.be/wIm6edbjhN0

  Why are the two sides so adamant about their positions on the bills?

Tiffiniy Cheng, director of online-freedom advocacy group Fight for the Future of Craigslist and Wikipedia , says both the SOPA and the Senate bill as written “give corporations too much power to take down entire sites over what they consider a copyright infringement including craigslist and Wikipedia.. And the language in the bills is really vague when it comes to ‘enabling copyright infringement.’ Cheng says the vagaries of the legislation could encourage credit-card companies and ad networks to “go on the safe side and comply with all requests from rights owners to shut down a site, even if it’s not really doing anything wrong. Plus, it could lead other sites to self-censor their posts to risk even the chance of liability.”

But in a statement supporting SOPA, the Motion Picture Association of America points out that “the potential harm from rogue sites — exposure to malware, identity theft, unsafe and untested medicines and other counterfeit products, and lost jobs and income for creative workers — is profound. Too much is at stake for us to allow rogue sites and those who operate them to continue to steal creative works with impunity.”

Who are the online protesters and what do they hope to achieve?

MoveOn.org is joining Reddit, Wikipedia, Mozilla and thousands of other sites, many of them in Silicon Valley, in a show of opposition to what they call “Internet censorship legislation that threatens free speech and technology innovation on the Internet.”

Cheng said more than 7,000 websites have agreed to take some sort of online action to rally opposition to the two bills, with Wikipedia planning to go dark for 24 hours starting 9 p.m. PST Tuesday. Other sites, including Mountain View-based Google, planned to issue protest statements on their home pages.

What’s the political prognosis for the legislation?

The Two  bills are currently tied up in Congress, with the Senate bill on hold while SOPA’s fate is pending action by the House Judiciary Committee. More shadows loom after the Obama administration issued a statement saying, “We will not support legislation that reduces freedom of expression, increases cybersecurity risk or undermines the dynamic, innovative global Internet.”  This will not stop Wikipedia.

 

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